Friday, March 26, 2010

The Deafening Silence

So, treasury officials have "acknowledged problems" with foreclosures  and the White House just made an announcement about helping those who may lose their homes. 


Moreover, a colleague of mine and a great friend stated: "the foreclosure issue is something that can be quantified. [People] can see neighborhoods taking nasty turns as the foreclosures increase." (Tim Ranzetta also provides disturbing evidence of how over 55% of counties have over 10% student loan delinquency rate, and he's expressing the same sentiments, i.e., President Obama should be turning his attention to current student borrowers).

Guess what? That's what makes the issue legitimate. On the other hand, those who are part of the indentured educated class continue to languish as government officials refuse to acknowledge that defaults have spiked. That also means that people aren't able to buy homes, cars, start families - why is this not considered a crisis too? Why are they helping those who have foreclosed on their homes and yet refusing to help or even acknowledge student loan debtors? I am at a loss. Their silence speaks volumes, but I refuse to accept this type of deliberate marginalization.

This type of silence also means that we will continue to be attacked on the internet and told that we're lazy, jobless losers (none of which is true).

So, here's my question for you: if there's a way to show that people are really suffering with student loans and are probably losing their homes too, then more attention would be given to it by the government. But how do we demonstrate that there is indeed a student lending crisis affecting millions of people? 

10 comments:

Lisa RM said...

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?listing_id=39983091

Maybe if everyone floods an agreed upon site with listings like this one, we could bring some attention to the situation. I saw this this morning and practically had to cry.

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

To the nasty person who said no one gives a damned - I beg to differ. The Rev. Jesse Jackson cares, Sen. Sherrod Brown cares, and so do thousands of others. But I do think you for the claim. The fact that you tried to post something nasty also shows me that word is getting out. I am greatly appreciative.

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

Lisa - thanks for the post. I think your suggestion is a good one.

Emmet said...

Thank you. This is an issue that greatly affects me and could for the next twenty to thirty years if nothing is done.

Anonymous said...

The millions of people need to stop wishing and hoping someone will take care of it for them and start organizing people! It is time to take personal responsibility and start working for reform, not the student loan companies.

TormentorSioux said...

no one gives a fig about your cry for help. you may celebrate when you get an occasional answer/acknowledgment from the corrupt politicians about your crusade. but lies and delays are the only things you will ever get from them. you borrowed money, you should pay it back.

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

You're quite welcome, Emmet. I hope you can find me on FB and join our cause to change things for the future and for current borrowers!

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

I don't think people are just sitting around wishing for change, Anonymous. If you've read much of my blog, you'll find that we are indeed organizing for change. So, we agree. It is time to take personal responsibility and push for reform.

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

Well, as I said - TormentorSioux - I beg to differ. No one here is saying they don't want to pay the money back. I encourage you to explore the issue and then draw conclusions. In fact, you are welcome to email me, and I'll show you evidence of why this is a major problem for the U.S. and what we're doing to change it. I challenge you to write to me and actually use your real name instead of hiding behind some alias. It's easy to be rude, judgmental, and nasty when you can hide behind an alias. I encourage you to email me, tell me who you are, why you've run across my blog and why you think these things. So, for starters, how much have you read and researched on this issue?

Anonymous said...

I am no expert on student loan debt; just try to keep up with my own and my son's and these two alone makes for a pretty harsh scare--looks like the next 25 years of income after loan repayment that is equivalent to not having attended college at all. But, today when I renewed my Direct Loan Promissory Note, I took time to read the disclousre clauses--there are options for reductions in repayment amounts and percentages to income; family hardships; and forgiveness of balances owed after 25 years (which is a 15 year extension beyond the standard 10 years t repay). Also military, teachers, and in some other instances, reductions or forbearance can be granted. Its not everything--but its something to look forward to--in another 20 years (if I survive), my burden will debt will be forgiven--and if I don't survive, it will also be forgiven--so all I have to do is hang in there for 25 years. If students can get through PhD dissertations; I think we have the stuff to get through the debt repayment as well.

Open for rebuttal and corrections--since I am in no way an expert.