Saturday, December 19, 2009

Korea, here I come

Many of you know that I am leaving the country and soon. I was offered a great teaching job that I couldn't turn down. Like so many of you, I sent out thousands of resumes and even managed to land some job interviews. One company even flew me up to Boston - I was their no. 1 pick - but then it turned out the old man boss didn't really fancy me and decided to change the entire job description, so I was no longer a candidate. Oh, and did I mention that that was after the following projects:

(1) Two preliminary screenings with their recruiter who found my profile on LinkedIn (it works - sign up). It was the day after my dog died, so I thought, "what the hell? I'll give this opportunity a try."
(2) An hour-long phone interview with the VP (who is a lovely individual and someone with whom I wanted to work)
(3) A trip to Boston in one day (I was up for 16+ hours) to be interviewed by said p--- president, VP, and other members of the company. . .

Oh, but wait, those things weren't good enough. Remember? There are legions of highly qualified candidates, so they had me do another test. This time, I had to do a Webinar for the Prez and his crew. After that stage, the dude decided I wasn't the right choice. I really appreciated that. What a swell flippin' guy.

I also had an amazing job interview for a social media analyst position in the D.C. area. That would've been fabulous, and I am so glad I connected with the person recruiting for it. Swell job, swell position, swell crew of people (clear to me from meeting the main interviewer). But here's the kicker. I made it to the final cut(s) after 80 other people!

In addition, I left my job in publishing to pursue a full-time job for an advocacy group, but . . . uh . . . that kinda fell through too.

Regardless, I will continue to advocate and plan on writing a book about this dilemma. I may be overseas but the work for the cause continues (trust me, it does!).

15 comments:

John Burbridge said...

What happened with your position with FSLD?

The Burwoodian said...

Wow! Well, I definitely appreciate your situation, the opportunity, and I wish you the best, and thank you for giving your time and talents to the cause of Student Debt Relief. Best of luck in your new position and temporary home!

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

I will continue to work for Student Debt Relief in Korea. This job doesn't end, but I'll be able to spend more time working on this project and write, too. The crazy thing is - I can't do that in my own country, so I'll be heading some where else to continue my activism for others in the states.

Anonymous said...

There are simply too many people walking around with a BA/BS. A college degree ain't what it used to be.

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

Anon- it may not be what it used to be "worth," but I do not think believe it's a result of too many people with degrees. A more educated society is a healthier one. We're destroying that fact, and more people in the U.S. ought to be educated. But not at the cost - that's one of the major problems.

Anonymous said...

it is supply and demand. the supply of college grads is too high, and the demand for the same has not kept up. if you recall (or learn very quickly) the law of supply and demand in lower division economics, the supply curve has drastically shifted to the right more than the demand curve has. so the equilibrium price is down but the equilibrium quantity is up.

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

I understand the so-called theory of supply and demand - there is no such things as supply and demand economics (it's a THEORY), and it doesn't apply in many instances. One problem is that the quality of degrees aren't the same. I'm not sure why you are trying to educate me on "supply and demand." There's such a thing as standards, and we're woefully in need of that.

Anonymous said...

the wages are cheaper in india and china. does that make sense?

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

Uh, if you just accept capitalism as the only model, then I guess your right, sure? But I happen to think there are better ways to deal with these types of problems, and I'm not just referring to the student lending crisis.

In saying that, I really hope you don't accuse me of being a Soviet of something.

Anonymous said...

if suddenly the world were struck by the second coming of black death, wiping out half the world population, then the employment picture would improve.

Anonymous said...

the world is coming to an end

Anonymous said...

I recently relocated abroad and I am once again enjoying healthcare and free education. I live in Europe and I am surprised at how efficient the universities are here. It’s funny because we pride our efficiency in America, but universities have hundreds of administrative workers and someone to hold the students hand around every corner. My observation is that American Universities care first about building more stadiums/wellness centers/dorms. Education comes in a distant second or maybe slightly behind creating more jobs and adding to the administrative staff. Do we really need all those student life directors? Do all the dorm rooms really have to look like plush condos? If a wall is not adorned with a flat screen TV will it fall over? My point is that college in the U.S. now has the look and feel of a summer camp, not an institution of higher learning.

Best of luck in Korea!

Anonymous said...

Cryn - Good Luck and best wishes! Merry Christmas!

Anonymous said...

Run and don't look back! Just forget your loans and live life again. America is falling apart and I can name off the top of my head at least 20 other countries I would happily rather spend my living days. Perhaps one day (who knows when this will be...10 years? 20? 30?) you can come back and just have them all discharged- like is already the case in Canada. This student loan bubble has to pop at some point...too many lives have been ruined already! Why stay in America and keep throwing your money into a bottomless black hole? I am surprised more people don't consider this. I know I am.

C. Cryn Johannsen said...

Here's my problem - I will be looking back, because I am an activist and committed to thousands and thousands of people who are drowning in debt. I hate that it's gotten so bad for so many, and I wish I could stay here and fight. But at this point, I can't find a job to save my life and Koreans want me for what I have to offer. I have to do what's best for me, but will continue to be involved.